MANE News and Events

Announcements

Engineering faculty members were honored with annual recognition awards at the School of Engineering 2015 Faculty Achievement Dinner, held May 12th at Revolution Hall in Troy.
 
The Classroom Excellence Awards were presented by Kurt Anderson, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, to Amir H. Hirsa, Professor of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering and to Patrick T. Underhill, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering.
 

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — The shortage of critical personal protective equipment (PPE) has been a persistent problem for medical and other front-line workers as they battle the COVID-19 pandemic at close range day after day. A team of researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has developed a potential solution: a machine that uses ultraviolet (UVC) light to sterilize thousands of protective masks each day, rendering them safe for reuse.
TROY, N.Y. — On a typical April day, Jackie Pelham would spend most of her time in a lab coat and goggles. Working at a laboratory bench, she would examine proteins found in the body. But lately, Pelham has traded her lab coat for a laptop and her lab bench for a desk in her home. Rather than observing biochemical processes, she is poring over previously collected data. Somewhat unexpectedly, even to her, Pelham sees this temporary trade-off as an opportunity.
TROY, N.Y. — An interdisciplinary team of engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is answering a national call for solutions to the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) available in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.
TROY, N.Y. — There is a growing appreciation within the research community for the ways in which the biomechanics of the tumor environment may contribute to how its cells grow and even spread throughout the body. The closer researchers can get to re-creating those mechanical factors in the lab, the better they will understand tumor cell migration and how to stop cells before they invade other tissue.
TROY, N.Y. — Tens of thousands of reservoir and dam systems are being operated in communities across the United States, ensuring access to reliable sources of water. That access, however, isn’t a guarantee. Altered rainfall patterns driven by global warming, increased urbanization, and growing populations are setting up parallel increases in demand for water and energy.
TROY, N.Y. — Without ever leaving the room where they are studying, civil engineering students can now transport themselves into the field where they must take measurements, make observations, and understand the impact of the environment on their designs, and their designs on the environment.
TROY, N.Y. — Finding safe solutions for the millions of adults in the United States who are battling obesity could vastly improve human health. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, obesity affected 39.8% of adults in the U.S. in 2015-2016.
TROY, N.Y. — Glioblastomas are complex, fast-growing malignant brain tumors that are made up of various types of cells. Even with aggressive treatment — which often includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy — glioblastomas are difficult to treat, leading to an average survival of 11-15 months.
TROY, N.Y. — Engineer Mark Z. Jacobson has testified before the U.S. Congress numerous times, written several books, and even appeared on late-night television to talk about clean-energy plans. This week, Jacobson, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University and founder of The Solutions Project, will participate in a special panel discussion on decarbonization at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
TROY, N.Y. — Designing more efficient buildings could significantly decrease the nation’s energy consumption. In 2018 alone, homes and businesses consumed about 40% of the energy used in the United States.