MANE News and Events

Imagine this: A soldier with a gunshot wound arrives in a battleground hospital and undergoes X-rays and CT scans to determine the full extent of the damage. The attending surgeon inputs the scans into a computer, which uses the data to create an ultra-realistic 3-D model of the injury site. The surgeon then hits “print” and within a few minutes is holding a near-perfect, full-size replica of the injured area—whether it’s a shoulder, a thigh, a head, or an internal organ.

Professor George Xu has been invited by Administrator Lisa Jackson of US Environmental Protection Agency to serve as a member of EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) Radiation Advisory Committee. The Radiation Advisory Committee is organized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. Committee member's scientific and technical expertise, experience and innovation play critical roles in the success of the EPA's approach to effective environmental protection.

New Tenured Professor Known Internationally for Research on Morphing Helicopters, Advanced Configurations, and Adaptive Cellular Structures.

Rotorcraft and adaptive structures expert Farhan Gandhi recently joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as the Rosalind and John J. Redfern Jr. ’33 Professor of Engineering. He is a tenured full professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering.

More than $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy will strengthen nuclear research and education, and help develop the next generation of nuclear technology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
The grants will support two research projects within the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, & Nuclear Engineering, fund improvements in laboratory space, and provide scholarships in nuclear engineering.

At the 2012 ANS Student Conference, held in Las Vegas Nevada by the UNLV ANS Student Section, seniors Joe Mancuso, Ryan Norval, and Matthew Riblett joined the ranks of RPI students past and present, having won their session in Accelerator Applications.

NASA research pilots Frank Batteas '77, who grew up in New York state and now lives in California, spent his college years at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, where he earned a degree in nuclear engineering. Batteas spent 21 years in the Air Force before joining NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., as a test pilot. According to his entry on the NASA website, he has more than 8,000 hours of military and civilian flight time in a variety of aircraft. As a test pilot, Batteas has flown the KC-135, C-17, F/A-18, F-15, B-747 and DC-8.

At the recent School of Engineering Faculty Awards Dinner, Prof Bimal Malaviya received Teaching Excellence Award recognizing his exceptional contribution in his 47-year career at Rensselaer. Prof Emily Liu received Research Excellence Award in the junior faculty category. Profs George Xu and Peter Caracappa received the Team Research Award for their NIH-funded project “Virtual Patients” in collaboration with Prof Suvranu De. Congratulations!

Prof. George Xu is elected Vice Chair and Justin Vazquez, graduate student, is elected a member of Executive Committee of Radiation Protection & Shielding Division, American Nuclear Society.

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — Optoelectronic materials that are capable of converting the energy of light into electricity, and electricity into light, have promising applications as light-emitting, energy-harvesting, and sensing technologies. However, devices made of these materials are often plagued by inefficiency, losing significant useful energy as heat. To break the current limits of efficiency, new principles of light-electricity conversion are needed.
The future of quantum computing may depend on the further development and understanding of semiconductor materials known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). These atomically thin materials develop unique and useful electrical, mechanical, and optical properties when they are manipulated by pressure, light, or temperature.
More strategic and coordinated travel restrictions likely could have reduced the spread of COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic. That’s according to new research published in Communications Physics. This finding stems from new modeling conducted by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.