MANE News and Events

Announcements

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Faculty and graduate students from the Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Department (MANE) will provide an overview of their Master's and PhD programs, discuss their research and life as a graduate student at Rensselaer. Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask questions and learn about the application process.

Amir Hirsa, professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, and a group of undergraduate and graduate students recently returned from Sanford International Airport in Florida after completing an experiment in zero gravity.

“I couldn’t have asked for better people—smarter, more talented, harder-working, or more creative to work with. The ones that weren’t flying were working on their aerodynamics homework in the aircraft hangar,” said Hirsa.

On Friday, October 13, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson hosted alumni, guests, and campus members at the launch of a capital campaign designed to position Rensselaer for its third century of leadership in research and education. “Transformative: Campaign for Global Change” will seek to raise $1 billion for student scholarships, faculty support, and campus enhancements.

Institute News

Blood sample analysis showed that, two to five years after they gave birth, mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had several significantly different metabolite levels compared to mothers of typically developing children. That’s according to new research recently published in BMC Pediatrics by a multidisciplinary team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Arizona State University, and the Mayo Clinic.
As communities across the United States struggle to manage a wave of COVID-19 infections, a multidisciplinary team of researchers argue that the pandemic has revealed the ways in which engineered structures and services have contributed to society’s challenges. They subsequently insist that the built environment — including both engineered structures and services — cannot be ignored when developing long-term pandemic mitigation.
TROY, N.Y. — A loss of enzymatic processes within the body can increase a person’s risk of bone fracture. This new insight was recently published in eLife by an international team of scientists and engineers led by Deepak Vashishth, the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
The stress that COVID-19 has placed on medical facilities across the country highlights the need for safe, convenient, and functional surge capacity that can be used for hospital care or quarantine during a public health crisis.
In order for future lunar exploration missions to be successful and land more precisely, engineers must equip spacecraft with technologies that allow them to “see” where they are and travel to where they need to be. Finding specific locations amid the moon’s complicated topography is not a simple task.
An estimated 50 million people worldwide live with dementia, a syndrome that progressively affects a person’s cognitive function. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, but a full understanding of the mechanisms behind how and why it occurs remains elusive.
With communities across the nation experiencing a wave of COVID-19 infections, clinicians need effective tools that will enable them to aggressively and accurately treat each patient based on their specific disease presentation, health history, and medical risks.
For individuals with central nervous system paralysis, the effectiveness of neuroprosthetic technology — such as brain-controlled prosthetic limbs or muscle stimulation devices — makes a world of difference. If the process of implanting tiny electrodes in the brain were to be improved, allowing for stronger and longer lasting communication between neurons and external devices, it could significantly enhance quality of life.
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute envision a day when surgeons will benefit from personalized training, rather than sheer practice repetition, thanks to novel neuroimaging and artificial intelligence methodologies. Under this method, surgeons would complete technical tasks while images of their brain activity reveal how well they have mastered critical skills.
The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted how a nimble and innovative manufacturing sector can address some of humanity’s most pressing and emergent needs —  from the production of masks and face shields to the biomanufacturing of therapeutics. Beginning on Monday, November 2, high school students from across the region will have an opportunity to explore some of the wide-ranging potentials of manufacturing during the 9th Annual National Manufacturing Day celebration at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.