MANE News and Events

Announcements

Professor George Xu has been invited by Administrator Lisa Jackson of US Environmental Protection Agency to serve as a member of EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) Radiation Advisory Committee. The Radiation Advisory Committee is organized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. Committee member's scientific and technical expertise, experience and innovation play critical roles in the success of the EPA's approach to effective environmental protection.

New Tenured Professor Known Internationally for Research on Morphing Helicopters, Advanced Configurations, and Adaptive Cellular Structures.

Rotorcraft and adaptive structures expert Farhan Gandhi recently joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as the Rosalind and John J. Redfern Jr. ’33 Professor of Engineering. He is a tenured full professor in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering.

More than $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy will strengthen nuclear research and education, and help develop the next generation of nuclear technology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
The grants will support two research projects within the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, & Nuclear Engineering, fund improvements in laboratory space, and provide scholarships in nuclear engineering.

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers antibiotic resistance one of the most urgent public health threats, one that affects communities worldwide. The ramifications of bacteria’s ability to become resistant to antibiotics can be seen in hospitals, public places, our food supply, and our water.
TROY, N.Y. — At the cellular level, cancer can be viewed as a mechanical engineering challenge. The disease alters the structure and function of cells and tissues, which are meant to perform very specific tasks. Through better understanding of the mechanical processes at work in tumors, Kristen Mills, an assistant professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, hopes to support the development of more effective treatments.
TROY, N.Y. — Victims of human trafficking in the United States number in the thousands each year, but little is understood about the networks that perpetuate these crimes. Mathematical models designed by systems engineers could help researchers gain critical insight into trafficking operations and develop effective methods for bringing people to safety.
TROY, N.Y. — Communities throughout the world are being exposed to an ever-changing variety of natural and technological hazards. In 2012, for example, Superstorm Sandy produced unusually severe flash flooding in rural Vermont, exposed the vulnerabilities of barrier islands in New York to high-wind events, and led to renewed questions of society’s ability to prepare for and respond to emerging natural hazards.
TROY, N.Y. — If you’ve ever dropped your smartphone on a concrete floor, you know that dreaded feeling as you turn it over to see how badly the screen has cracked — but that stress may soon be a thing of the past. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have discovered a way to make glass less brittle and less likely to break. Their findings, led by Yunfeng Shi, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer, were recently published in Nano Lett.
TROY, N.Y. — If researchers could observe drug delivery and its effect on cancer cells in real time, they would be able to tailor treatment options with unprecedented specificity.
TROY, N.Y. — Biopharmaceuticals are necessary, life-saving tools. But the process for making them is time-consuming and costly, particularly when it comes to the process of purification — the removal of unwanted elements like proteins, viruses, and DNA. 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will host a speaker series throughout this academic year examining the effects of human activity on climate, the changing climate’s impact on humans, and the action needed to address such a complex issue.
Troy, N.Y. — It often takes time for power system malfunctions to be found and fixed, at times leading to larger system failures. If operators could identify system disturbances as they happen and take action before they lead to large outages, the power grid would be substantially more reliable and resilient. With recent support from the National Science Foundation, Meng Wang, an associate professor of electrical, computer, and systems engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is developing software to make that real-time analysis possible.
A promising semiconductor material could be improved if flaws previously thought irrelevant to performance are reduced, according to research published today in Nature Communications.