MANE News and Events

Announcements

Professor Antoinette Maniatty on how nanotechnology and computer modeling can lead to safer air travel: http://approach.rpi.edu/2012/04/09/metal-fatigue-and-you/

New Research Center To Tackle Critical Challenges Related to Aircraft Design, Wind Energy, Smart Buildings

Imagine this: A soldier with a gunshot wound arrives in a battleground hospital and undergoes X-rays and CT scans to determine the full extent of the damage. The attending surgeon inputs the scans into a computer, which uses the data to create an ultra-realistic 3-D model of the injury site. The surgeon then hits “print” and within a few minutes is holding a near-perfect, full-size replica of the injured area—whether it’s a shoulder, a thigh, a head, or an internal organ.

Institute News

TROY, N.Y. — Improving the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases like cancer will require more detailed, rapid, and agile imaging technology that can show doctors not just what a specific organ looks like, but also what’s happening within the cells that make up those tissues.
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have been working on two fronts to perfect continuous blood glucose monitor and insulin pump technologies: they are developing algorithms to create a closed-loop system that can effectively operate similar to a healthy pancreas, and they are working to make that system more accessible and understandable for users with diabetes.
Recent work by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is demonstrating how data from online games can help provide meaningful insights.
People with diabetes face a significantly higher risk of osteoporotic fractures than those without the disease, but the reason for this is not well understood and can’t be adequately predicted.
TROY, N.Y. — Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a way to 3D print living skin, complete with blood vessels. The advancement, published online today in Tissue Engineering Part A, is a significant step toward creating grafts that are more like the skin our bodies produce naturally.
TROY, N.Y. — Manufacturing — the physical creation of products — touches nearly every aspect of our lives, from the phones in our hands and the cars that we drive, to the renewable energy that will power our world and the next generation of biopharmaceuticals.
TROY, N.Y. — Spinal cord damage that causes paralysis and reduced mobility doesn’t always stop with the initial trauma, but there are few treatment options to halt increased deterioration — and there is no cure. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a promising new biomaterial that could offer targeted treatment to the damaged spinal cord and tissue, preventing further damage.
TROY, N.Y. — An interactive structure designed, built, and programmed by student engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will soon be a source of serenity for people supported at The Arc of Rensselaer County, an organization that provides services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The unique sensory structure will be unveiled at a public event on Wednesday, October 23 at 1 p.m., at The Arc of Rensselaer County, located at 4015 NY2, Troy, N.Y.
TROY, N.Y. — When scientists and engineers discover new ways to optimize existing materials, it paves the way for innovations that make everything from our phones and computers to our medical equipment smaller, faster, and more efficient.
TROY, N.Y. — Magnetogenetics — the idea that you can use magnetic fields to control cells and activate cellular pathways — has immense potential in biomanufacturing, medicine, tissue regeneration, and biosensing. Despite its promise, the mechanism behind magnetogenetics remains largely unknown. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in partnership with researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, are setting out to solve that mystery with support from a National Science Foundation grant.