MANE News and Events

Nuclear engineering expert George Xu, the Edward E. Hood Jr. Endowed Chair of Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been selected to receive the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award of the Health Physics Society. The award will be given during the 2018 Annual Meeting in Cleveland, Ohio, July 15-19 at the Huntington Cleveland Convention Center.

 Li (Emily) Liu, associate professor of nuclear engineering and engineering physics in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) to receive a $1.8 million award to study high-temperature molten-salt properties and corrosion mechanisms.

Li (Emily) Liu, associate professor of nuclear engineering and engineering physics in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been named a fellow of the Executive Leadership in Academic Technology and Engineering program—ELATE at Drexel—a professional development program for women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

Michael “Miki” Amitay, the James L. Decker ’45 Endowed Chair in Aerospace Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has received a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to study the phenomenon of flow separation on aircraft wings, which could lead to improved aerodynamic performance in future-generation air vehicles.

Tribology expert John Tichy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, has received the Donald Wilcock Distinguished Service Award from the Tribology Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

Tichy is the seventh recipient of the award, which was established in 1989 to honor “distinguished service to the Tribology Division and the tribology community throughout the recipient’s career.”

webinar graphic

Faculty and graduate students from the Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering Department (MANE) will provide an overview of their Master's and PhD programs, discuss their research and life as a graduate student at Rensselaer. Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask questions and learn about the application process.

Amir Hirsa, professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, and a group of undergraduate and graduate students recently returned from Sanford International Airport in Florida after completing an experiment in zero gravity.

“I couldn’t have asked for better people—smarter, more talented, harder-working, or more creative to work with. The ones that weren’t flying were working on their aerodynamics homework in the aircraft hangar,” said Hirsa.

On Friday, October 13, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson hosted alumni, guests, and campus members at the launch of a capital campaign designed to position Rensselaer for its third century of leadership in research and education. “Transformative: Campaign for Global Change” will seek to raise $1 billion for student scholarships, faculty support, and campus enhancements.

Institute News

Professor Emeritus Michael I. Savic, age 89, died in Atlanta, Georgia on June 24, 2019. He was born in Belgrade, Serbia, and immigrated to the United States in 1967. Dr. Savic received a Dr. Eng. Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia, in 1965. He was principal investigator on 32 major projects, mainly in areas of industrial and biomedical electronics, and in signal processing. He published over 79 professional papers, and was granted eight patents; 220 citations of his work were published in literature.
TROY, N.Y. — Imagine you are heading to the grocery store and receive a phone alert asking if you’d also be willing to bring your neighbor’s groceries home. Or you are on your way to a concert and see you could fill the seats of your car—and your wallet—if you picked up a few other music fans along the way. As the supplier in these scenarios, you have the choice of which services you provide and when. This may very well be the way commerce is headed.
TROY, N.Y. —Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.